A Meta-Analysis of the Social Competence of Children with Learning Disabilities Compared to Classmates of Low and Average to High Achievement
Elizabeth A. Nowicki
Learning Disability Quarterly
Vol. 26, No. 3 (Summer, 2003), pp. 171-188

Abstract: This meta-analysis synthesized research since 1990 pertaining to the social competence of children with learning disabilities in inclusive classrooms. Comparisons with average to high-achieving classmates resulted in medium to large effect sizes for teachers’ perceptions of social competence, peer preference ratings, positive peer nominations, global self-worth, and the self-perceptions of scholastic performance. A second set of comparisons with children designated as low in academic achievement yielded moderate effect sizes for teachers’ perceptions of social competence and for peer social preference ratings. Small effect sizes were obtained for global self-worth and self-perceptions of scholastic performance. It was concluded that (a) children with learning disabilities and children designated as low in academic achievement are at a greater risk for social difficulties than are average to high-achieving children and (b) children with learning disabilities and their low-achieving classmates do not appear to have accurate self-perceptions of social acceptance.

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